Nothing To Do With Your Hands

NOTHIN’!!

That’s it. Smoking has nothing to do with your hands and you should not try to do anything special with your hands when you quit smoking. Use your hands like a non smoker that you want to be.

I know what many say, that you must find something to do with your hands to replace the habit of handling the cigarette. That relies on the belief that, as you did a certain thing for so long (habit), it would be hard for you to stop doing it at once, so you need to continue for a while.

Before you go watch the video below this article, let me clarify something:

I used the word “habit” only to let the reading flow. If you know my stuff for a while, you know that smoking is not a habit. So trying to remove something that’s not there will only drain your energy and confuse you even more on your way to freedom.

soap carvingWhen you think about it, we learned to handle the cigarettes only because we needed to. You didn’t make any conscious effort or practice to learn the gestures of smoking.
A new necessity generated a new function. Removing the necessity, we also remove the function.
Un-learning to handle cigarettes, or, actually, not having to do it anymore, is as simple as not using the cigarettes anymore. No more need, no more function required.

Professional drivers won’t keep pushing an imaginary pedal when they’re not driving. If you see one doing it while eating or watching tv, please call 911, something’s wrong!

When you started smoking, you didn’t need to practise walking around with a straw or a pencil between your fingers. For your whole life prior to becoming a smoker you didn’t do it, so, if a habit is strong, how come it wasn’t hard to learn holding the cigarette after a lifetime of not holding it??

Funny how some smokers learned to play fancy tricks with the pack, for example spinning it between the table and the pointer finger, to entertain and impress their spectators. I wasn’t able to learn that and, after trying few times, I realised it was old news already, so I didn’t want to be just like everybody (wink).

Personally I did learn to do new things after quitting smoking, like fruit carving and soap carving, but that’s because I re-discovered the true beauty of living, not to replace something that I should have never done in the first place.
You can watch my carving collections on Facebook: click here to see my Fruit carvings: fruit z  click here for my Soap carvings: soup

So do whatever you want to do with your hands after you quit smoking, but please think of doing it for the sake of your betterment.

Make it easy for you to quit by shifting the way you accept to look at things.

If you belive what they say, that it is hard to quit and that, among others, you must do something with your hands, well… it will be hard, because you make it hard.
Instead, choose to see how what I said simply makes sense. You’ll soon realise that understanding this will also make it easier for you to drop one more negative belief that stays in your way to feeling free from smoking cravings.

Walking around with a straw meant to replace the cigarette in your hand will not help you to quit. You didn’t need one to get used to holding the cigarettes, when you became a smoker.

Not only that won’t help, but it will actually hurt your feelings, in two ways:

First, it will keep smoking in your mind for longer, making it feel important on an unconscious level. It will give smoking an authority over your mind, which it doesn’t have in reality.

Second, because you accept to do such a thing as pretending the straw replaces the cigarette. Please don’t mind me, but realise it is you who already told to yourself it is silly. Even if you tell yourself that it helps, you quietly ruin your own self-esteem, every time you do something you don’t fully belive in. You let that thing fool you, then you fool yourself that you actually need it, then you unconsciously disrespect yourself for being such a fool.

Don’t alow that to happen from now on. Be realistic, make sure everything makes sense, to the point where you can explain it to someone else.

 

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About the author: Corneliu Nicoara